Blackline Safety customer glossary

Updated July 5, 2022

The Blackline Safety Customer Glossary is a collection of words, phrases and acronyms that are commonly used at Blackline Safety. 

Press and hold CTRL+F (Command+F for Mac users), then type the word, phrase or acronym you’d like to find. You can also jump to a particular section by selecting its title in the table of contents below.

The Glossary is maintained by Blackline’s Performance & Learning team. Please submit
your suggestions for new words or offer corrections to existing entries by contacting learning@blacklinesafety.com

 

Blackline Devices

Blackline Live

Blackline Analytics and Vision

Safety Operations Center / Monitoring

Blackline Safety Processes

Gas Detection

Technology

Certifications and Regulations

General Health and Safety

Blackline Devices

ANT Field Strength Meter (FSM): Gives real-time feedback of the signal strength of Location Beacon. Only used for Location Beacon system setups.

Blue LiveResponse light: Indicates that monitoring personnel have acknowledged your red alert and are following your company’s response protocol.

Check-in: A feature designed to confirm that you are OK. When your device’s check-in timer reaches zero, your device will go into yellow pending alarm. If you do not cancel the alarm within your configured time period, a red alert will be generated, and monitoring personnel will be notified.

Configuration modes: Used to customize G7’s behavior depending on the specific use of the device. High risk, leak check, normal, pump run, SCBA, and pre-entry are the configuration modes that can be used by our devices. Some configuration modes require a pump.

Early check-in: If configured, you can check in before the timer reaches zero b pushing on the latch for three seconds. This will reset your check-in timer before the yellow pending alarm sounds.

Fall detection: In the event of a fall, a yellow pending alarm will sound and will escalate into a red alert if not canceled within your configured time period.

G7 Bridge: Blackline Safety product launched in 2017. A portable satellite and 3G base station, which switches seamlessly to satellite connectivity should cellular become unavailable. G7x communicates with G7 Bridge via an industrial-quality 900 MHz radio link from up to 2 km away. 

G7 Dock: Blackline Safety product that helps you easily charge, calibrate and bump test G7 wearable devices.

G7 EXO: Blackline Safety product launched in 2020. A portable area monitor that uses cellular networks to establish a connection to the Blackline Safety Cloud. An optional satellite module can be installed if the device will be used in more remote locations. Can be equipped with a pump module for the active sampling of an area.

G7c: Blackline Safety product launched in 2017. A wearable personal safety device that uses cellular networks to establish a connection to the Blackline Safety Cloud. Can be fitted with a single- or multi-gas sensor cartridge. Features include an SOS latch, check-in timer, fall detection, no-motion detection, push-to-talk, texting and voice calls, and gas detection.

G7x: Blackline Safety product launched in 2017. A wearable personal safety device that works alongside G7 Bridge to establish a connection to the Blackline Safety Cloud via either satellite or cellular networks. Typically used in remote locations where cellular networks can be spotty or unavailable. Can be fitted with a single- or multi-gas sensor cartridge. Has the same feature set as G7c except for voice calling and PTT.

Gas out exhaust: Transfers calibration gas from G7 Dock to a safe exhaust location.

Green connectivity light: Indicates if your device is connected to the Blackline Safety Cloud. A solid light means your device is connected to the Cloud and your safety is being monitored. A flashing light means your device is not connected to the Cloud.

High gas alert: When gas levels are above the configured high concentration threshold, G7 will inform you with a red alert, which can be immediately communicated to monitoring personnel (for Blackline-monitored devices).

High risk mode: Configuration mode for G7 wearable devices. Typically used in general high-risk situations, such as evacuations or when traveling through known dangerous areas.

Inlets: The supply location for gas on G7 dock and G7 EXO’s pump module.

Interface ports: Feature on G7 EXO. Other accessories and devices can be plugged into the ports to allow G7 EXO to turn equipment on or off, trigger an external alarm, prevent access to a job site with potential hazards, or ventilate an area before gas levels exceed safe amounts.

Leak check mode: Configuration mode for G7 wearable devices. Typically used when G7 is being used to check for gas leaks in an area. 

Location Beacon: Blackline Safety product relaunched in 2016 after being previously called AntHill. A compact, wireless positioning transmitter. G7 devices communicate with Location Beacons to help increase location accuracy when GPS signals are unreliable or unavailable, such as inside buildings.

Loner 900 / Loner Bridge: Blackline Safety products launched in 2013 and retired in 2020. Precursor to G7x and G7 Bridge. Features were the same as Loner M6, but the device was intended for workers in more remote locations. Communicated via radio link with Loner Bridge, which helped provide more accurate GPS positioning in remote areas.

Loner Duo: Blackline Safety product launched in 2011. Pairs with Loner Mobile via Bluetooth. Features an SOS latch to assist workers in situations where they cannot quickly access the app’s help button.

Loner M6 / M6i: Blackline Safety product launched in 2016 and retired in 2020. Precursor to G7c. Features included an emergency latch, fall and no-motion detection, GPS locating, check-ins, alert communication to monitoring personnel, and ability to make two-way voice calls with monitoring personnel. Loner M6i was an intrinsically safe version of Loner M6 that could be used in more hazardous locations.

Loner Mobile: Blackline Safety smartphone application launched in 2008 for Blackberry and in 2015 for Android and iOS. Intended for lone worker monitoring and has features including an emergency button and GPS locating.

Loner SMD / IS: Blackline Safety product launched in 2012 and retired in 2020. Precursor to Loner M6 and G7 wearables line of products. Features included an emergency latch, fall and no-motion detection, GPS locating, durable case, check-ins, and alert communication to monitoring personnel. Loner IS was the intrinsically safe version of Loner SMD that could be used in more hazardous locations.

Low warning alarm for gas: When gas levels reach the configured low concentration threshold, G7 will inform you with a yellow warning alarm every two minutes until gas levels are reduced or until you enter an area with lower levels of gas.

Maintenance code: Feature on G7 EXO. Can be enabled to prevent unauthorized individuals from changing the device’s settings. G7 EXO’s entire menu, device power-down and volume change actions are locked when a maintenance code is enabled. Entering the code will allow you to access locked features.

Multi-gas diffusion cartridge: G7 cartridge that supports your choice of two to four gas sensors.

Multi-gas pump cartridge: G7 cartridge often used with a hose to sample the air in an area prior to entry, such as a confined space. Supports your choice of two to four gas sensors.

No-motion: Your device has the ability to automatically detect if you are motionless for a set period of time. If G7 does not detect any motion for a configured amount of time, a yellow pending alarm will sound and will escalate into a red alert if not canceled within your configured time period.

Non-intrinsically safe power supply: Charging option for G7 EXO. Plugs into a wall to provide a constant trickle charge to the device. This charging option is not intrinsically safe.

Normal mode: Regular operational mode for G7 wearable devices. The pump is turned off in this mode. This mode does not have a timeout. All features can operate in this mode.

Over limit (OL): An alert telling you that the gas reading has exceeded the range of your device's sensor. 

Peak readings: The highest readings of gas detected during an exposure. Aside from reporting the highest concentration of gas reported in a particular area, peak readings can also be used while performing leak checks and pre entry checks before entering a confined space. G7 records this reading locally on the device so that the device user can check it at any time.

Power port cable: Charging option for G7 EXO. Connects the device directly to a power source so that it can operate indefinitely. Can be wired into an intrinsically safe barrier by an industrial technician.

Pre-entry mode: Configuration mode for G7 wearable devices fitted with a pump cartridge. Typically used before entering a space that could potentially contain dangerous gas. In this mode, the pump will turn on to draw in surrounding air, or air through an attached hose, and pull it across the gas sensors.

Pump run mode: Configuration mode for G7 wearable devices fitted with a pump cartridge. This mode runs the pump continuously with no timeout.

Purge inlet: Supplies clean air to remove residual gas from G7 Dock.

Push-to-talk (PTT): A feature that allows you to send and receive voice messages to other G7 device users, similar to a walkie-talkie. This feature is not available on G7x but is compatible with G7c and G7 EXO.

Quick charger: Charging option for G7 EXO. Requires removal of the device’s battery. Takes up to 10 hours to fully charge.

Quick connects: The connection between G7 Dock’s gas inlets and the cylinder’s tubing.

Red alert: An alert sent to Blackline Live and safety monitoring personnel. Could be triggered by a fall, no-motion, missed check-in, SOS alert, high gas alert, STEL, TWA or OL.

Setpoints: The thresholds at which G7 devices will go into alarm or alert. The low threshold is when G7 will go into yellow warning alarm. The high threshold is when G7 will go into red alert. These setpoints are based on regulations and recommendations from organizations such as OSHA and ACGIH. Clients can customize these setpoints as needed.

SCBA mode: Configuration mode for G7 wearable devices. Typically used when entering an area known to have high gas levels and the worker is wearing SCBA or SABA equipment.

Silent SOS alert: If configured, you can push the latch button for three seconds to generate a red alert in Blackline Live without notifying anyone around you.

Single-gas cartridge: G7 cartridge that supports your choice of one gas sensor.

SOS alert: A manual alert to call for help that is triggered by pulling the red latch.

SOS latch: The red latch on G7c, G7x, and G7 EXO devices.
Can be pulled to initiate a red alert if the worker is hurt, in danger or requires other immediate assistance.

Standard (no-gas) cartridge: G7 cartridge with no gas detection. 

Survey tripod mount: Mounting option for G7 EXO. The legs of the mount can be adjusted based on the desired height of G7 EXO, and to account for uneven surfaces.

TeamAlert muster: An alarm sent from G7 Bridge to call all connected devices back to the bridge.

Transmit power level: Affects the range of Location Beacon’s signals. The lowest level (level 2) provides about 15 to 30 feet of coverage and is the default setting beacon is shipped with.

Under limit: An alert telling you that G7’s gas sensor’s baseline has shifted and become unreliable. A calibration is required.

Universal mount: Mounting option for G7 EXO. Can be attached to a wall, scaffolding, or other site infrastructure at the desired height of G7 EXO. Gas canisters can be mounted alongside the device to ensure easy bump testing and calibration.

Yellow pending alarm: An alarm between you and your device. Your device is asking you to confirm if you are OK, after it detected a potential fall, potential no-motion, or check-in. Press the red latch to acknowledge the alarm and return the device to normal functionality. These alarms will escalate to a red alert if the red latch is not pushed within the configured amount of time.

Yellow warning alarm: An alarm between you and your device. Your device has a message for you, which could be: a text message, an incoming speaker phone call, network connection interruption, low battery, low gas alarm, under limit, sensor error, overdue calibration, or bump test. Yellow warning alarms never escalate to a red alert. Press and hold the up and down arrow buttons at the same time to acknowledge the message and silence the alarm.

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Blackline Live

Account administrator: Type of contact group. People added to this contact group will receive all communications, including billing and finance notifications, new features and site improvements, web portal or service interruptions.

Account user: Users who have access to Blackline Live. Can be assigned devices and attached to alert profiles. This access can be customized depending on the level of permissions required for each specific user.

Alert banner: Displays any active red alerts in organizations you have access to. Visible in the top navigation bar on every page in the Blackline Live portal when there is an active alert.

Alert management: Location in Blackline Live where alert profiles can be added and updated. Accessed from the Alert profiles page in the main menu.

Alert profile: Contains settings and instructions for how monitoring personnel should react when a device reports an alert situation. Multiple devices can be added to the same alert profile to ensure that monitoring personnel react to multiple alert situations in the same way. Multiple alert profiles can be created within the same organization, allowing different groups of devices to have different settings. However, each device can only be assigned to a single alert profile.

Alerts page: Displays alerts that have occurred and been received by the server in the last 24 hours by default. Use the date filters to find historic alerts up to 125 days old. For older alerts, use Blackline Analytics. Accessed from the main menu.

Amazon Web Services (AWS): A highly secure online platform with world-leading encryption managed by Amazon. Blackline Live is hosted on this platform.

Analytics only: Role in Blackline Live. Users assigned to this role can only view Blackline Analytics.

Beacons page: Displays all beacons in an organization, including their name, ID, street address and coordinates. Select the name or ID number to edit the location for a beacon.

Billing and finance billing: Type of contact group. People added to this contact group will only receive communication regarding billing and finance notifications.

Blackline Live: Blackline Safety web application launched in 2016. Cloud-hosted monitoring and device management software. Devices can be configured, monitored and notified from Blackline Live. Alerts triggered on devices can be managed and addressed by Blackline’s Safety Operations Center personnel, or by each organization’s dedicated monitoring personnel.

Compliance role: Role in Blackline Live. Users assigned to this role can monitor the compliance of their device fleet. They will have access to the Dashboard page and the Mass notifications page.

Configuration profile: Contains settings related to how a device functions in the field. Multiple devices can be added to the same profile, so that all of the devices function in the same way. Multiple configuration profiles can be created within the same organization, allowing different groups of devices to have different settings. However, each device can only be assigned to a single configuration profile.

Configurations page: Lists all device configuration profiles. Select Add Configuration to create a new configuration profile. Select the name of a configuration profile to view its settings and make changes.

Contact: Users who do not have access to Blackline Live but can be assigned to devices and alert profiles. Contacts do not require a valid email address. 

Contact admin: Role in Blackline Live. Users assigned to this role can assign devices to workers. They will have access to the Devices, Team members and Quick assign pages to make device assignments.

Contact group: Used by Blackline Safety to contact clients for a variety of reasons, including billing and finance notifications, new features and site improvements, and web portal or service interruptions. Providing and maintaining the appropriate contact information below will ensure that the most appropriate individual receives our communications. Can be added and modified from the Alerts page.

Dashboard page: Contains fleet health and suggested maintenance information for an organization. Accessed from the main menu.

Device admin: Role in Blackline Live. Users assigned to this role can resolve alerts, send mass notifications, create and manage contacts, reassign devices, and create and assign profiles.

Device ID: An individual code for each device, located on the back product sticker. Also known as Unit ID.

Devices page: Lists all the devices in an organization, including the device type, device name, ID, assigned team member, last communication with Blackline Live, and any configuration or alert profiles assigned to a device. Select the name or ID of a device to modify device details and assign it to a Group.

Docks page: Displays all Docks in an organization, including their name, ID and configuration status. Select the Dock name to edit details such as inlet settings.

Emergency responder: Role in Blackline Live. Recommended for monitoring agents who will be resolving alerts. Users assigned to this role can resolve alerts and access the maps page, meaning they can see all device locations, not just the ones in alert. if keeping this kind of detailed information hidden is important Blackline recommends using the Emergency response admin role instead.

Emergency response admin: Role in Blackline Live. Recommended for monitoring admin who will respond to alerts, but is more limited than the Resolve only role. Users assigned to this role can only access the Alert management and Mass notifications page. They do not have access to maps unless resolving an alert.

Fleet admin: Role in Blackline Live. Users assigned to this role have limited abilities to manage their own group or fleet. They can assign devices, manage groups, and resolve alerts. They do not have access to maps unless resolving an alert.

Fleet health dashboard: Provides up-to-the-minute quick overviews on the compliance of a fleet. One pie chart displays the percentage of devices that are currently online versus devices that are offline. A second pie chart displays the percentage of devices that are compliant versus devices
that require action. Accessed from the Dashboard page in
the main menu.

Floorplan: A pictorial diagram showing an overhead view of a building’s layout, including rooms, hallways and doors. Can be imported into Blackline Live to increase the accuracy of a worker’s location while indoors, which can reduce response time from emergency responders.

Floorplans page: Lists all floorplans in an organization. Accessed from the main menu.

Group: Can be created in Blackline Live to provide more insight into data analytics. Can be created to reflect the structure of the organization, such as by worksite, teams, divisions or role. For instance, an organization that wants to know if its electricians are calibrating their devices regularly can create a group on Blackline Live for devices assigned to electricians.

Group admin: Role in Blackline Live. Users assigned to this role can resolve alerts, send mass notifications, create and manage contacts, reassign devices, create and assign profiles, create and manage groups, and create and manage account users.

Group manager: An account user with access to a group in order to manage the devices within that group.

Groups page: Displays all the groups in an organization. Select Add group to create a new group.

History view: Located on the main map page in Blackline Live. Can be used to search for past events, retrace a device’s steps, and view locations of a particular user or device.

Info box: Appears in the right sidebar after a map pin in Blackline Live has been selected. Contains details about that device and its location. Different map pins will contain different types of information in their info boxes.

Info bubble: Appears next to a map pin when a pin is
selected or hovered over with a mouse cursor in Blackline
Live. It displays the device name, nearest beacon (if available), and company (if available).

Latitude and longitude: A geographic coordinate system that enables every location on earth to be specified by a set of numbers. The coordinates are chosen such that one of the numbers represents vertical position, and the other represents the horizontal position. For example: 51.038117, -114.033912. Coordinates are used by Blackline Live to indicate a device’s current position or the location of an event or alert. Coordinates are communicated to emergency responders during a response.

Live view: Located on the Live map in Blackline Live. Default homepage for Blackline Live. Shows the most recent location of all online users or devices within an organization.

Map pin: Small graphic icons located on the Blackline Live map that designate a device’s location. A red map pin means your device is in alert, a blue map pin means your device is online, and a grey map pin means your device is offline.

Mass notifications page: Press the Send button to send a direct message to every online G7 device in a specific organization or group. The number of characters is limited to 16, based on the device display limits.

Notification: An email or text message sent to specified contacts when events are triggered on a device.

Notification profile: Contains settings for sending notifications depending on certain events. Choose which events trigger notifications, and add the information for notified contacts. Assign the notification profile to devices as needed. Accessed from the Alerts profile page in the main menu.

Organization: Blackline Live account.

Organization admin: Role in Blackline Live. Users assigned to this role can view all pages and perform all actions, including resolving alerts, sending mass notifications, creating and managing contacts, reassigning devices, creating and assigning profiles, creating and managing groups, creating and managing account users, creating relationships, and editing organization details.

Organization assistant: Role in Blackline Live. Users assigned to this role can support and assist the Organization admin role. They can manage devices, team members, profiles, groups and organization details, but cannot request or manage relationships with other organizations. They do not have access to maps unless resolving an alert.

Organization details: Page in Blackline Live where information about the organization can be edited, such as the organization name, time zone and display units.

Personally Identifiable Information (PII): Any data that can identify a specific individual, such as their name or social security/insurance number. Some Blackline Live roles ensure that this kind of information can be hidden, whereas other roles require this information to perform certain actions.

Push notification: Alert information, specially formatted and sent from the Blackline system to a third-party monitoring company.

Quick assign page: Easy way to assign and unassign devices from team members, and to attach employee IDs to devices. Enter a device ID and select Add contact to assign the device. Accessed from the main menu.

Relationship: Your organization can be linked to other organizations through a relationship agreement. In each agreement, there is a client and a provider. The client can invite an organization to be a provider. If the provider accepts, they will have access to the client’s shared groups.

Resolve only: Role in Blackline Live. Users assigned to this role can view all pages but can only resolve alerts.

Response protocol: The steps that monitoring personnel will follow if you are in an emergency situation.

Service interruption notification: Type of contact group. People added to this contact group will receive information in the event that Blackline or any services that Blackline depends on are interrupted resulting in a temporary loss of service.

Site plan: The overhead view of several different buildings in one area. Can be imported into Blackline Live to increase the accuracy of a worker’s location, which can reduce response time from emergency responders.

Suggested maintenance dashboard: Review the issues concerning your fleet’s health, such as failed or missed bump tests or calibrations, and take action with suggested resolutions, such as performing a bump test or calibration, and checking gas cylinder pressure and concentration. Accessed from the Dashboard page in the main menu.

Team members page: Lists all team members in an organization, including their name, employee ID, email and permission level. Select their name or employee ID to add or modify information. Accessed from the main menu.

Unit ID: An individual code for each device, located on the back product sticker. Also known as Device ID.

View only: Role in Blackline Live. Users assigned to this role can view all pages but cannot perform any actions. 

Website updates and new features: Type of contact group. People added to this contact group will receive information regarding new features and changes to the functionality of Blackline Live.

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Blackline Analytics and Vision

Alerts report: Blackline Analytics report that customers can use to gain information and insights about the types of alerts experienced by users, including details about processing and acknowledgment times and the reasons for resolving alerts.

Algorithm: A procedure executed by a computer based on a set of rules implemented by the programmer. 

Artificial intelligence (AI): The ability of computers to perform tasks commonly associated with humans, such as problem-solving and decision making. Examples of AI include chatbots, text-to-speech translation, and image recognition.

Big data: Very large quantities of data that can be analyzed to reveal patterns.

Blackline Analytics: Blackline Safety’s collection of dashboards and reports that are comprised of data collected by Blackline devices, such as alert types, event locations, bump tests and calibrations, and close contacts. Customers can use the dashboards to make informed business decisions. Included with your purchase of Blackline devices and is accessed through Blackline Live

Blackline Vision: Blackline Safety’s data science extension. These team members create customized dashboards and reports for customers to help them make informed business decisions.

Bump tests and calibrations report: Blackline Analytics report that customers can use to gain information and insights about the specific details behind the bump tests and calibrations being performed on a fleet of devices.

Close contact report: Blackline Analytics report that customers can use to gain information and insights about close encounters between workers on a site, which can be used to conduct contact tracing investigations and encourage proper social distancing.

Data analytics: The process of cleaning, inspecting and visualizing data to extract information, draw conclusions and uncover meaningful patterns.

Data science: The use of scientific methods, algorithms, and processes to understand and draw insights from raw data.

Data visualization: The presentation of information in a graphical format, usually in the form of charts, graphs, tables, and diagrams.

Descriptive analytics: A type of data analytics that involves looking at historical data to determine when and where certain incidents occurred, such as gas exposures.

Device assignment history: Blackline Analytics report that customers can use to see every change made to the assignment history of a fleet of devices, including changes made to device names and assigned users.

Device logs: Customers can use this log to see a full detailed list of every event and interaction that has occurred on every device in a fleet, including the time, latitude and longitude, and location type for each event.

Devices and cartridges report: Blackline Analytics report that customers can use to gain information and insights about the firmware status and cartridges used by each device in a fleet.

Diagnostic analytics: A type of data analytics that involves looking at current information and attempting to decode why it is happening, such as determining when and where a safety incident is occurring and attempting to figure out what could have caused the incident. Examples of such incidents include falls, no-motions and gas exposures. 

Docks report: Blackline Analytics report that customers can use to gain information and insights about the number of successful bump tests and calibrations performed on each dock.

Events map report: Blackline Analytics report that customers can use to gain information and insights about the locations of events experienced by users.

Events report: Blackline Analytics report that customers can use to gain information and insights about the types of events experienced by users over time, and the types of gas events detected by each sensor.

Gas readings report: Blackline Analytics report that customers can use to gain information and insights about the specific gas readings detected by each sensor, including the locations where these gas readings occurred.

LEL-MPS readings report: Blackline Analytics report that customers can use to gain information and insights about the specific gas readings detected by a customer’s LEL-MPS sensor, including the locations where these gas readings occurred.

Location beacons report: Blackline Analytics report that customers can use to gain information and insights about the battery levels and locations reported by the beacons in a fleet of devices.

Microsoft Power BI: A service provided by Microsoft for creating dashboards and data visualizations based on supplied data. Used to create Blackline Analytics dashboards and reports.

Predictive analytics: A type of data analytics that involves trying to predict potential outcomes. For example, we can look for inefficiencies on a job site to help organizations better plan the placement of key infrastructure to ensure optimal productivity and to prevent safety incidents from happening.

Raw data: Data as it has been collected from its source. Will need to be cleaned up before being processed into dashboards or visualizations.

Usage and compliance report: Blackline Analytics report that customers can use to gain information and insights about the amount of time a fleet spends being compliant with bump test and calibration requirements.

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Safety Operations Center / Monitoring

Alert ID: The identification number attached to an alert in progress. This number must be shared with GARMIN when dispatching.

Assisted log off: When Safety Operations Center agents turn off the check-in timer on a device in an area with spotty or no service. This action will not turn the device off; it will only prevent the next missed check-in from occurring. If you perform an assisted log off on a device that is online and has no-motion and fall detection features toggled on, these functions will still alert on the device as a fail-safe.

Client card: A section of the alert management page in Blackline Live that contains the name, contact numbers, device ID, and alert type of the device user in alert.

Degraded performance: Status type for servers and applications related to the Safety Operations Center. The server/application is having some issues but is still functioning.

Demo/training: An alert resolution option. Choose this option when an alert was triggered during the course of a pilot, evaluation, demonstration, or training course.

False alert with dispatch: An alert resolution option. Choose this option when an alert was triggered but contact with the user or their emergency contacts could not be established or could not confirm if the user is okay. Dispatch was sent and later, the user/emergency contact/dispatchers confirmed the user is okay.

False alert without dispatch: An alert resolution option. Choose this option when an alert was triggered, but upon contacting the user or their emergency contacts, it was determined the user is okay and does not need dispatch.

GARMIN: Dispatching company that has partnered with Blackline Safety to help Safety Operations Center agents dispatch emergency services to users in distress around the globe.

GridAtlas: An online tool used by Safety Operations Center agents to convert GPS latitude and longitude coordinates to LSD or NTS coordinates, if either of those coordinates are requested by the emergency contact of a device user in alert.

Incident with dispatch: An alert resolution option. Choose this option when an alert was triggered and the user or their emergency contact confirms that an incident has occurred, and dispatch is required.

Incident without dispatch: An alert resolution option. Choose this option when an alert was triggered, and the user confirms that an incident has occurred, but that dispatch is not required.

Legal sub-divisions (LSDs): A land survey system used in Western Canada to divide land in 1 square mile sections. 

Major outage: Status type for servers and applications related to the Safety Operations Center. The server/application is not working and is unusable.

National Topographic System (NTS): A topographic map that provides a detailed and accurate illustration of man-made and natural features on the ground such as roads, railways, power transmission lines, contours, elevations, rivers, lakes and geographical names. 

Operational: Status type for servers and applications related to the Safety Operations Center. The server/application is working as designed.

Outage: Status type for servers and applications related to the Safety Operations Center. The server/application is not communicating properly, causing delayed or missing certain information.

Safety Operations Center (SOC): Blackline’s in-house monitoring center, operated by certified and professionally trained monitoring agents who use Blackline Live to monitor an organization’s employees and carry out documented response protocols in the case of an alert.

System maintenance: An alert resolution option. Choose this option when our cellular/satellite communications partners have planned or unplanned maintenance that has affected our devices, or if Blackline’s IT team is performing maintenance on the portal that affects our users.

System test: An alert resolution option. Choose this option when an alert was triggered for the purpose of testing the device or testing the Safety Operations Center’s response time.

Under maintenance: Status type for servers and applications related to the Safety Operations Center. The server/application is undergoing some scheduled work, and you may experience some down time during this maintenance.

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Blackline Safety Processes

Blended model: Purchase option for Blackline Safety products and services. Comprised of hardware purchase plan plus service plan. Warranty is valid for as long as the service plan is active.

Business Development Directors (BDD): Blackline Safety team members responsible for driving new opportunities with specific corporate accounts and focuses on a top-down approach by targeting C-level and Executive titles, with the goal of bringing together the overall corporate strategy with local and regional efforts.

Business Development Manager (BDM): Blackline Safety team members who oversee the various Business Development Directors at Blackline Safety.

Channel Operations: Blackline Safety team focused on communicating value to, through, with and for channel partners. They maintain the partner portal, dealer sales and incentive programs including Dealer Registration, Sales Rebate, Referral Program and short-term partner-facing promotions. They manage the dealer scorecard and tiering process, onboard new partners and manage offboarding of terminating partners.

Client Implementation Coordinators (CIC): Blackline Safety
team responsible for supporting new clients through a successful deployment of our solutions, including account creation, customization of functionality, activation of devices, the writing protocols as well as training for users about Blackline devices, portal and analytics.

Client Success Managers (CSM): Blackline Safety team members responsible for maintaining ongoing customer satisfaction with Blackline Safety’s products and services.

Customer Care Representatives (CCR): Blackline Safety team members responsible for answering technical questions from customers and troubleshooting, and for escalating advanced issues to the necessary teams.

Customer Marketing: Blackline Safety team responsible for responsible for the development of customer-facing newsletters, up-sell and cross-sell programs, acquisition of customer testimonials and case studies for use in our marketing materials, and ensuring a quality customer feedback loop to contribute to the optimization of customer hand-off processes from marketing through to account management.

Demand Generation & Marketing Operations: Blackline Safety team responsible for campaign management, digital marketing, email marketing, webinars, account-based marketing, conversion rate optimization, regional trade
shows, joint marketing with channel partners and customer loyalty marketing.

Evaluation: A free trial of Blackline products for a potential customer to see if our products meet their worker safety needs. No payments have been made and no contracts have been signed at this point. Coordinated by Blackline’s Sales Engineering team. 

Lease model: Purchase option for Blackline Safety products and services. Hardware and service is leased monthly under this model.

New Product Introduction (NPI): The process of bringing a new product onto the market, starting with the definition of goals and objectives for the new product, through to market testing and evaluation of the new product.

Performance & Learning: Blackline Safety team responsible for developing and facilitating learning experiences for Blackline customers, employees and distribution partners.

Pilot: Paid trial of Blackline products for a potential customer. Coordinated by a joint effort from Blackline’s Sales Engineering team and Client Implementation Coordinators.

Product Management: Blackline Safety team responsible for gathering feedback (from sales, distribution, customers, and employees) to prioritize the products and features that Blackline should be focusing on and understand how they can be profitable.

Purchase model: Purchase option for Blackline Safety products and services. One-time purchase price only. No service fees. Warranty and system access are active for 2 years. Additional warranty and service available.

Q-HIMO: Represents a multi-gas diffusion cartridge with H2S, LEL-IR, CO, and O2 gas sensors in a SKU.

Regional Sales Managers (RSM): Blackline Safety team members responsible for managing sales opportunities in the pipeline, with the goal of converting those sales opportunities to paying customers.

Return Merchandise Authorization (RMA): The process of returning a product for a replacement, refund or repair during the warranty period. This process is facilitated through Blackline’s Customer Care department.

Sales Development Representatives (SDR): Blackline Safety team members responsible for handling all MQLs for Blackline Safety. The team members learn about the client’s needs to ensure a great fit between the product recommendation and client specification. Once qualified, the SDR will hand over the client to the appropriate RSM or distribution partner.

Sales Engineering: Blackline Safety team responsible for the end-to-end customer evaluation process during the sales cycle. Also responsible for proving how and why Blackline’s solution will meet the customer’s criteria for success.

Stock Keeping Unit (SKU): An alphanumeric code assigned to every product and service. Used when preparing and sending quotes to customers. Helps the business keep track
of sales and inventory.

User Experience (UX): Blackline Safety team responsible for defining and designing the experience our customers have with our products, including packaging design, technical user manuals and the user interface of our products.

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Gas Detection

Acute toxicity: Occurs immediately during or after exposure to usually a high concentration of a substance. Effects range from mild symptoms to severe complications, including death. Some effects may be reversible once the exposure stops.

American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH): A charitable scientific organization and professional association for industrial hygienists that is committed to advancing worker protection measures and environmental health. Makes recommendations and guidelines for allowable exposure levels

Area monitoring: A type of gas detection system often used in areas where fixed gas detection is not practical, or during temporary procedures or emergencies, to provide early warning of a gas event in a facility to nearby workers and the public. Devices can be moved around the facility depending on the location of the gas hazard.

Asphyxiant gas: A type of gas that consumes or displaces the amount of oxygen in the air, leading to insufficient oxygen for human life. Main risk of exposure is suffocation due to the lack of oxygen. Examples include methane, nitrogen and helium.

Atomic weight: The mass of a single atom.

Balance gas: The gas used to fill the remainder of the calibration gas cylinder after the correct concentrations of the calibration gases have been included. Typically either
air or nitrogen.

Breathing zone: A 25cm / 10in radius around the nose. Gas detection devices are usually worn here to detect changes in the air that a worker is breathing in.

Bump test: A safe practice where G7’s alarm indicators and gas sensors are tested by applying a known concentration and amount of gas to confirm the sensors will trigger an alarm in the event of gas exposure. Some guidelines require daily bump tests. Blackline Safety recommends you do not exceed 30 days without a bump test.

Calibration gas: Used to calibrate gas sensors. Contains known quantities of all gases required to perform the calibration procedure.

Calibration: The application of a known concentration of gas to a gas detection device for a set amount of time to ensure the gas sensor can accurately detect gas levels through its operating life. Calibration schedules depend on your company’s safety policy. Blackline Safety recommends not exceeding 180 days without a calibration.

Carboxyhemoglobin (COHb): Forms in the blood when carbon monoxide binds with red blood cells. Restricts the ability of blood cells to carry oxygen. The higher the concentration of COHb in the blood, the more dangerous to your body. High concentrations result in death.

Catalytic bead sensor: Measures the presence and approximate concentration of combustible gases in an environment. When gas particles enter the sensor, they are heated and undergo combustion in two different places. The temperature difference between these two places indicates the presence and approximate concentration of gas in an environment. Requires oxygen in order to function. Also known as a Pellistor sensor.

Ceiling: Highest immediate exposure allowable. Once the ceiling is reached, evacuate the area and seek medical care if necessary. The health effects of exceeding the ceiling can be acute (immediate).

Chemical Abstract Service (CAS) number: A unique numerical identifier assigned to every known chemical compound by the Chemical Abstract Service. Often located on Safety Data Sheets.

Chemical formula: Represents the number and types of atoms in each element of a compound. Some gases may be discussed and popularly known by their chemical formula, such as H2S (hydrogen sulfide). Can be used to quickly determine the properties of the gas because the types of molecules that make up the gas are clearly displayed.

Chronic toxicity: Occurs over multiple exposures to low concentrations of a substance, usually leading to a buildup of the substance in the body over time. Effects are likely not immediately seen or felt. Some effects may be mild, such as developing a skin irritation over time to a substance, or severe, such as cancer. Most effects are often irreversible.

Combustible gas: A type of gas that will burn or explode if there is enough oxygen in the environment. Many combustible gases are hydrocarbons (made up of hydrogen and carbon atoms). Main risk is fire or explosion. Examples include methane, butane and propane.

Common name: The name for chemical compounds most known and recognized by the general public. May or may not provide some indication of its chemical structure. 

Compliance: Legislated requirements of organizations to report on proper use and maintenance of gas detection equipment. Organizations are often required to prove they are compliant with legislation: that employees are using their gas detectors when required, are properly trained in the use and maintenance of their equipment, and are maintaining their equipment according to the standards in the legislation.

Correction factors: A mathematical equation applied to gas sensor readings to provide a more accurate reading. Most sensors are only fully accurate to the gas it has been calibrated with. When detecting gases that are not the calibration gas, correction factors must be applied to ensure that an accurate reading is given. Depending on the device and sensor, correction factors can be automatically applied, or manually applied by a worker.

Cross sensitivity: When a sensor reacts to gases that are not its target gas, leading to improper readings and damaged sensors.

Density: Mass divided by volume. Used by the Molecular Property Spectrometer (MPS) sensor in its classification process.

Diffusion mode: The base mode for normal operation of gas detection devices based on the principle of diffusion: particles move from areas of higher concentrations to areas with lower concentrations. Gas particles passively enter the device as concentrations increase.

Electrochemical sensor: Measures the presence and concentration of known toxic gases in an environment. Changes in the electrical current inside the sensor components indicate the presence of toxic gases.

Ethyl mercaptan: A compound added to natural gas by utility companies so that a leak can be identified by humans, because natural gas is odorless. Smells like leeks, onions or cooked cabbage.

Fail-to-safe: The desired state for any sensor failure. The sensor has a built-in system to determine if it is not operating properly, allowing the device to notify the user of the fault.

Fail-to-unsafe: A sensor failure mode in which the operator is not made aware of the fault. The operator will continue to work unprotected, thinking their device is still properly detecting gas levels.

Fire triangle: Represents the three elements necessary for a fire to occur: heat, oxygen and fuel.

Fixed gas detection: A type of gas detection system where permanent sensors are placed at strategic locations throughout a facility to provide early warning of an unplanned gas release.

Flammable range: The concentration of gas in the air that is most likely to lead to a fire or explosion. The lower level of this range is called the Lower Explosive Limit (LEL). Concentrations less than the LEL cannot combust because there is not enough fuel. The upper level of this range is called the Upper Explosive Limit (UEL). Concentrations greater than the UEL cannot combust because there is not enough oxygen. Each gas has a distinct flammable range with widely varying LEL and UEL concentrations.

Flash point: The lowest temperature at which a liquid’s surface gives off enough vapor to be ignited by a spark or small flame.

Gas stratification: The way in which a gas settles in an atmosphere, based on its relative vapor density.

Grams per mole: A unit of measurement used to communicate the molecular weight of a compound. The mass per one mole of an atom. 

Hydrocarbon combustion: Occurs when a hydrocarbon compound such as methane mixes with oxygen and is heated to sufficient temperature to cause a reaction. The heat source breaks the hydrocarbon bonds and creates carbon dioxide and water. The formation of the carbon dioxide and water molecules releases energy in the form of heat.

Hydrocarbon compound: An organic chemical compound made up of only carbon and hydrogen elements.

Hydrogen combustion: Occurs when hydrogen gas mixes with oxygen and is heated to sufficient temperature to cause a combustion reaction, resulting in water.

Ignition temperature: The lowest temperature at which a combustible gas can ignite without a heat source like a spark or small flame.

Incomplete combustion: When the process of combustion cannot finish due to a lack of oxygen. The introduction of oxygen into the area would allow combustion to complete.

Inhibition: Occurs when certain compounds are absorbed into the catalytic bead of a Pellistor sensor, temporarily reducing its sensitivity.

Lower explosive limit (LEL): The lower level of the flammable range for combustible gases. Concentrations less than the LEL cannot combust because there is not enough fuel. Each gas has a distinct LEL.

Mass: The quantity of matter that an object contains.

Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) sensor: A part of the MPS sensor that combines mechanical and electrical components onto a single chip. The mechanical component of the sensor heats the gas. The electrical component of the sensor measures the properties of the gas mixture.

Mole: The base measurement for elements of a compound. For example, in methane (CH4), there is 1 mole of carbon and 4 moles of hydrogen.

Molecular Property Spectrometer (MPS) sensor: Measures the presence and concentration of combustible gases in an environment. The sensor components analyze the properties of the gas, such as its molecular weight, to classify the gas and adjust its readings for greater accuracy.

Molecular weight: The average mass of any chemical compound, usually expressed in g/mol (grams per mole). The sum of the atomic weights of the atoms that make up the molecule. Used by the MPS sensor in its classification process.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH): An American federal agency that makes research-backed recommendations for strategies to prevent and limit worker-related injuries, illnesses, and incidents. Makes recommendations and guidelines for allowable exposure levels.

Nondispersive infrared (NDIR) sensor: Measures the presence and approximate concentration of hydrocarbons in an environment. The sensor passes infrared light through the atoms that enter the sensor and measures the resulting intensity of infrared light that exits the sensor components.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA): An American agency within the federal Department of Labor that makes recommendations and guidelines for allowable exposure levels.

Oxidation: When a substance combines with oxygen to produce another substance. For example, iron undergoes oxidization to form rust.

Oxy-fuel welding and cutting: The use of fuel and oxygen to weld and cut through various metals.

Oxygen depletion: Occurs when the concentration of oxygen in the air becomes significantly lower than 20.9%. Often caused by displacement due to the presence of asphyxiant gases, or during any process that requires the use of oxygen. Can cause very serious health effects, including suffocation and death. 

Oxygen enrichment: Occurs when the concentration of oxygen in the air becomes significantly higher than 20.9%. Usually occurs when oxygen is released as the by-product to a chemical process, or when compressed oxygen is intentionally released to create a chemical reaction. Can lead to spontaneous combustion.

Parts per billion (ppb): A unit of measurement often used if you are measuring for extremely minuscule concentrations of substances.

Parts per million (ppm): The mass of a chemical or contaminate per unit volume of water. A unit of measurement often used if you are measuring very small concentrations
of substances.

Pellistor sensor: Measures the presence and approximate concentration of combustible gases in an environment. When gas particles enter the sensor, they are heated and undergo combustion in two different places. The temperature difference between these two places indicates the presence and approximate concentration of gas in an environment. Requires oxygen in order to function. Also known as a catalytic bead sensor.

Percent lower explosive limit (%LEL): The percentage of a gas’ concentration relative to its lower explosive limit (LEL). The LEL of a gas is equal to 100%LEL. Workers want to know when concentrations are approaching the LEL of a gas so they can evacuate or take other safety measures as needed. Gas detection devices can be set to trigger alarms at various %LEL points.

Photoionization detector (PID) sensor: Measures the presence and concentration of known Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in an environment. Gas particles are passed through a UV lamp within the sensor. The resulting current of charged ions indicates the presences of Volatile Organic Compounds.

Poisoning: Occurs on a Pellistor sensor when contaminants decompose on the surface of the catalytic bead, leaving the sensor less sensitive to gases, or failing to detect gases completely. Once a sensor has been poisoned, it must be replaced. A worker will not know their sensor has been poisoned until a calibration is attempted.

Portable gas detection: Wearable devices that are often the last line of defense on a facility against gas events. Workers on a site with gas risks wear a portable gas monitor within their breathing zone to monitor the air they are being directly exposed to. When gas levels reach a set level, the personal monitor will alert the worker to the presence of gas.

Pumped mode: The mode required when using a gas detection device with a pump attachment. Gas particles are actively drawn into the device, usually through a hose, to measure the concentration of gas in an area. 

Relative vapor density: The density of a gas compared to the density of the air around it. Air is assigned a vapor density of 1.0. Gases with a relative vapor density less than 1.0 will tend to rise. Gases with a relative vapor density higher than 1.0 will tend to fall closer to the ground. 

Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA): A portable device that provides breathable air to its wearer from an attached tank.

Sensor overload: When a Pellistor sensor is exposed to high concentrations of combustible gas, it may experience a baseline shift in readings. This shift can take several days to revert to normal.

Short-term exposure limit (STEL): The average exposure to a hazardous substance over a 10 to 15-minute period. Should not be exceeded at any time during a workday. The health effects of exceeding STEL can be acute (immediate) and/or chronic (long-term).

Supplied air breathing apparatus (SABA): A device that provides breathable air to its wearer from a stationary point in a safe environment. Often has a small back-up tank in case a disruption occurs to the supplied air apparatus.

Threshold of toxicological concern (TTC): The amount of intake or exposure to a substance that is deemed safe or of low or negligible risk.

Time-weighted average (TWA): Maximum allowable exposure averaged over 8 hours. Up to this limit is usually considered safe with no long-term health effects. The health effects of exceeding TWA can be chronic (long-term).

Toxic gas: A type of gas that will cause chronic (long-term) or acute (immediate) effects in the body during and/or after exposure. Main risk of exposure to this type of gas is poisoning. Examples include carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and ammonia.

Upper explosive limit (UEL): The upper level of the flammable range for combustible gases. Concentrations greater than the UEL cannot combust because there is not enough oxygen. 

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs): Chemicals that naturally evaporate at room temperature and release gases into the air. Often associated with very serious chronic health risks. An example is benzene, which is commonly found in crude oil. Can also be found in the home in some cleaning solvents, aerosols, paint, and paint thinners.

Volume per volume (%v/v): The percentage mixture of a gas in the air. 

Wheatstone bridge: An electrical circuit used in the Pellistor sensor to compare electrical resistance between the sensor’s two beads.

Zeroing: A method for resetting the sensors to baseline if you are unable to perform a calibration. Must be conducted in an area with known safe levels of gas.

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Technology

Application Programming Interface (API): A software intermediary that allows two applications to talk to each other, particularly if the applications “speak” different languages.

Business intelligence: The use of data to inform best business practices.

Cloud computing: The practice of using a network of remote servers hosted on the internet to store, manage, and process data, rather than a local server or a personal computer.

Connected safety: The use of technology to improve worker safety, health and safety processes, and work processes.

Conversation hijacking: A type of phishing attack where hackers intercept legitimate email conversations between individuals to spread malware inside corporate networks.

Data encryption: A method for protecting confidential and private data by converting it into an encoded format that can only be unlocked or translated by a code, password or key.

Data ownership: The legal rights and responsibilities associated with controlling data. A company will have data ownership over the data generated by that company, and will have to determine who can access, control, restrict, modify and distribute that data.

Data privacy: The proper handling and management of confidential and private data that protects the individual or company behind the data. Often relates to data management regulatory requirements.

Data residency: The physical and geographic location of data stored on servers. Cloud computing complicates this because people may not know where their data is stored, and the data protection laws of the location may not be strong enough.

Data retention: Policies related to the short- and long-term storage of data, often for legal or record-keeping purposes, particularly business records that may involve personal or confidential data of clients or customers. A company’s data retention policy should clearly state which data is being stored, for how long, and for what purpose.

Direct-to-cloud: The practice of moving data straight from a workstation (laptop, desktop, mobile device, etc.) to cloud servers.

Firewall: A cybersecurity extension on browsers that helps identify suspicious links and websites. Many browsers like Google Chrome have built-in firewalls. Can also be physical hardware that catches threats and denies access to information.

Global Positioning System (GPS): A worldwide radio navigation system which uses satellite triangulation to derive a positioning location.

Groupe Spécial Mobile (GSM, or Global System for Mobile communication): The digital cellular network used by mobile phones to communicate. Some Blackline devices use this network to communicate and to triangulate approximate locations when GPS is not available.

Information technology (IT): Field of work that involves the use of computers and other technology to generate, store and transfer information.

Internet of Things (IoT): The connection of objects in our daily lives to the internet, to provide data and information about their functionality and to potentially improve our general livelihoods. Examples include smartphones, vehicles, televisions, gaming stations, and appliances.

LastPass: A browser extension that saves your login details and allows you to create unique and randomized passwords when creating new accounts.

Mimecast: A cybersecurity extension that helps email servers filter for spam and junk mail, and convert PDFs from unknown emails to safe-to-view formats. Blackline Safety uses Mimecast on Outlook to help keep employee and business information safe.

Multi-factor authentication: Needing two or more steps to unlock or log into an account, in an attempt to dissuade hackers. A common example is having a code texted to your phone number in addition to an account password. Both must be entered in order to gain access to the account in question.

On-premises hosting: When a company stores all servers, firewalls, applications, and systems in its physical office. The company is responsible for all maintenance on these products and services, and likely has an in-house IT team to manage everything. Was the only solution prior to cloud computing.

Phishing: An attempt by hackers to gain access to sensitive information such as credit card details, passwords or social insurance numbers. Essentially, hackers are “fishing” for details.

Project Web App (PWA): A project management platform powered by Microsoft.

Ransomware: A type of phishing attack where hackers send an email that includes a link to a website or attachment. The recipient of that email clicks on the link, which then initiates a malware download to the recipient’s computer. This malware encrypts network drives. Hackers demand a ransom payment in return for a decryption code. However, even if the ransom is paid, not everyone receives a decryption code.

Software as a Service (SaaS): Delivery model for software, often based on a subscription model, or monthly payments required for access. Blackline Live is an example of SaaS.

Single sign-on (SSO): The ability to log into several accounts with one ID and password.

Smishing and vishing: The variations in methods of communication that hackers use to get private information from their targets. Smishing uses SMS text messages. Vishing uses voice calls.

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Certifications and Regulations

Atmosphères Explosibles (ATEX): The minimum safety requirements defined by the European Union (EU) for equipment intended for use in explosive atmospheres.

General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR): A set of regulations defined by the European Union (EU) that must be followed by all companies that collect data on people within the EU, regardless of where the data is collected, stored or processed. GDPR breaches can lead to large financial penalties. Blackline Safety is subject to following GDPR for customers located in the EU. 

Ingress Protection (IP) Code: Identifies the level of protection provided by casings and enclosures on devices against dust, water, and other kinds of intrusion or breakage. G7 EXO and Location Beacons have an IP rating of 65, meaning that the devices have full protection from dust and particulates, and protection against spray from any angle. G7c and G7x have an IP rating of 67, meaning that the devices have full protection from dust and particulates, and protection against immersion up to one meter for 30 minutes. The IP code is defined by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC): An international regulatory body that sets standards for all electronic technologies, including home appliances, office equipment, and telecommunication equipment. The IEC defines standards for safety, the environment, terminology used, and the production process for electronic technologies.

Intrinsic safety: A design technique applied to electrical equipment and wiring for hazardous locations. The technique is based on limiting energy, electrical and thermal, to a level below that required to ignite a specific hazardous atmospheric mixture. Devices that may be used in hazardous areas like mines and refineries must be certified as intrinsically safe before sale.

Intrinsically safe (IS): A designation required by electronic devices which limits the energy available for ignition in areas with dangerous concentrations of flammable gases or dust. Intrinsically safe devices are often required for petrochemical refineries and mines.

Service Organization 2 (SOC2): A voluntary system in North America to ensure that basic security and data protection methods are employed. It may be required by some data processing partners. The specifics of the system can be tailored for each organization. Although voluntary, Blackline Safety is committed to meeting SOC 2 standards to ensure that our identifiable customer information is secure and controlled.

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General Health and Safety

Acute toxicity: Health hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class can be immediately and severely toxic, and can be very harmful when contacting the skin, swallowed or inhaled..

Aspiration hazard: Health hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class can be fatal if inhaled or swallowed.

Biohazardous infectious materials: Health hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class may involve bacteria, fungi, parasites or viruses that can cause infection in humans or animals.

Carcinogenicity: Health hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class may cause cancer.

Combustible dusts: Physical hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class are substances or mixtures made up of small particles that can catch fire or explode in the air if ignited.

Corrosive to metals: Physical hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class may damage or destroy metals, which can lead to spills, fires or reactive explosions. Examples of corrosives include hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide and nitric acid.

Flammable aerosols/gases/liquids/solids: Physical hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to these classes will burn if ignited by a hot surface, static discharge, or a spark.

Gases under pressure: Physical hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class may explode if heated. If the gas is refrigerated and starts leaking, it may cause frostbite or cold burns. A leaking cylinder may also quickly release gas into the air and displace oxygen, leading to oxygen deficiency or a flammable atmosphere. Gas cylinders may also rocket or torpedo if ruptured.

Germ cell mutagenicity: Health hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class may cause genetic defects, leading to birth defects or cancer.

Globally Harmonized System (GHS): System for classifying and labeling hazardous products developed by the United Nations. Used by several countries to have more efficiency in global trading, safer transport and handling of hazardous products, and reduced costs.

Hazard category: Assigned to a hazard class under WHMIS 2015 to indicate the degree of the hazard presented by the product. Category 1 is more hazardous than Category 2 or 3, and Category 1A is more hazardous than 1B or 1C, and so on.

Hazard class: Describes the different types of hazards presented by hazardous products under WHMIS 2015. Some products can belong to more than one hazard class.

Hazard group: WHMIS 2015 recognizes two types of hazard groups: physical and health. These groups are then further divided into classes, and each class can be assigned a category.

Hazard pictogram(s): Part of the label under WHMIS 2015 that visually indicates the particular hazard classification of the product.

Hazard statement(s): Part of the label under WHMIS 2015 that describes the hazards of the product as determined by its assigned hazard class(es) and category(ies). Standardized wordings help describe the specific degree of the hazard(s). The particular words in these statements can indicate the seriousness of the effects. For instance, “Fatal” is more serious than “Toxic,” and “Toxic” is more serious than “Harmful.”

Hazardous Products Act: Canadian federal legislation that outlines the criteria for what is considered a hazardous product.

Health hazards not otherwise classified: Health hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class do not fall under any other class but may cause injury, illness or even death after acute or repeated exposure.

Label: The first thing you see when working with a hazardous product. Describes the major hazards associated with the product and identifies some of the precautions you should take when working with it. Can be provided by either the workplace or by the supplier.

Lone worker: An individual who is completing work while alone, isolated and away from immediate supervision. This type of work is higher risk because of the lack of help or assistance available. Blackline Safety’s GPS-enabled devices can help lone workers access help in the event of an emergency.

Organic peroxides: Physical hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class are unstable and can be highly reactive if heated.

Oxidizing gases/liquids/solids: Physical hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class do not burn on their own but may increase a fire’s intensity or cause materials that do not normally burn to catch fire even without an ignition source.

Personal protection equipment (PPE): Articles of clothing and other equipment that provide a barrier between the body and dangerous substances and protect workers from dangerous situations and injury. Examples of PPE include goggles, gloves, masks, harnesses, closed-toe shoes, hearing protection, hard hats, high-visibility clothing and breathing apparatus.

Physical hazards not otherwise classified: Physical hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class do not fall under any other class but involve a chemical reaction that could result in immediate injury or death.

Precautionary statement(s): Part of the label under WHMIS 2015 that provides standardized advice about how to minimize or prevent harmful effects from the product. These statements might also include instructions about storing and using the product, as well as necessary PPE, first aid measures, and emergency information.

Product identifier: Part of the label under WHMIS 2015 that indicates the name of the product as it appears on the SDS and the container.

Pyrophoric gases/liquids/solids: Physical hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to these classes can immediately ignite when exposed to air.

Reproductive toxicity: Health hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class may interfere with fertility or pregnancies.

Respiratory sensitization: Health hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class may exacerbate allergy or asthma symptoms, or cause breathing difficulties once inhaled.

Safety Data Sheet: A document provided by the supplier of a hazardous product that includes information about the supplier, the hazards associated with the product, the precautions one should take when working with the product, and potential emergency measures to take if needed. These documents are all written in a standardized format no matter the supplier. The document can be any number of pages so long as all 16 mandatory sections are included.

Self-heating substances and mixtures: Physical hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class may ignite when exposed to air, but not as immediately as the products assigned to the pyrophoric class.

Self-reactive substances and mixtures: Physical hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class may be unstable and can cause a fire or explosion or increase the intensity of a fire or explosion.

Signal word: Part of the label under WHMIS 2015 that indicates the severity of the hazard. “Danger” is reserved for more severe hazards, while “Warning” is reserved for less severe hazards. Some low-hazard categories do not get a signal word assigned to them.

Simple asphyxiants: Physical hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class may displace oxygen in the air.

Skin sensitization/irritation/corrosion: Health hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to these classes may cause allergic reactions, intense irritation, or burns.

Specific target organ toxicity – repeated exposure: Health hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this to this class may damage organs after repeated or prolonged exposure.

Specific target organ toxicity – single exposure: Health hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class may damage organs after one exposure, and potentially cause respiratory irritation, drowsiness, or dizziness.

Substances and mixtures which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases: Physical hazard class under WHMIS 2015. Products assigned to this class, as the name indicates, emit flammable gases, sometimes spontaneously, when in contact with water.

Supplier identification: Part of the label under WHMIS 2015 that specifies the name of the supplier and their contact information.

Workplace Hazard Materials Information System (WHMIS 2015): A comprehensive, standardized system for classifying and labeling hazardous products. Merged with GHS in 2015.

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